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    Not all cats are grey in the dark! — ScienceDaily

    Our eyes are sensitive to only three spectral color bands (red, green, blue), and we all know that we can no longer distinguish colors if it becomes very dark. Spectroscopists can identify many more colors by the frequencies of the light waves, so that they can distinguish atoms and molecules by their spectral fingerprints. In […] More

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    AHA, AMA ask Congress to extend suspension of Medicare sequester

    Dive Brief: The American Hospital Association, American Medical Association and other healthcare-related trade groups have asked Congressional leaders to continue the suspension of the Medicare “sequester” well into next year. The sequester was part of a 2012 deal to avoid hitting the federal debt ceiling. It was suspended under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic […] More

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    How the Venus Flytrap ‘Remembers’ When It Captures Prey

    Scientists are continuing to tease out the mechanisms by which the Venus flytrap can tell when it has captured a tasty insect as prey as opposed to an inedible object (or just a false alarm). There is evidence that the carnivorous plant has something akin to a short-term “memory,” and a team of Japanese scientists […] More

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    NICE changes stance on Keytruda for first-line head and neck cancer –

    As recently as June, NICE was minded not to back routine NHS of MSD’s Keytruda as a first-line treatment for advanced head and neck cancer, but it has had a partial change of heart on the drug after the company submitted new data. Just-published draft final guidance from the cost-effectiveness agency gives a green light […] More

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    Poverty May Up Black Children’s Health Risks Early

    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Kids growing up in poverty show the effects of being poor as early as age 5 — especially those who are Black, a new study suggests. The research adds to mounting evidence that children of Black parents who are also poor face greater […] More

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    Searching for Clues to COVID-19 Immunity

    Joel Ernst, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the division of experimental medicine, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco. Santosha Vardhana, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and attending physician, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Nicolas Vabret, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York. Medline […] More

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    War on plastic is distracting from more urgent threats to environment, experts warn — ScienceDaily

    A team of leading environmental experts, spearheaded by the University of Nottingham, have warned that the current war on plastic is detracting from the bigger threats to the environment. In an article published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews (WIREs) Water, the 13 experts say that while plastic waste is an issue, its […] More

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    WHO, Wikipedia Expands Public Access to Trusted Info About COVID-19 –

    What You Should Know: – The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Wikimedia Foundation forms collaboration to expand public access to reliable, trusted information about COVID-19. – The collaboration is part of a shared commitment from both organizations to ensure everyone has access to critical public health information surrounding the global coronavirus pandemic. The World […] More

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    Did Real Hobbits Ever Exist? The Question Isn’t As Crazy As It Sounds

    The hobbits of J.R.R. Tolkien’s imagination have no counterpart in our world. The short-statured creatures depicted, of course, in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy must remain in Middle Earth. But a groundbreaking anthropological discovery did reveal that our world once had its own species of hobbits — different than Tolkien’s, certainly, […] More

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    ICR urges change as NICE rejects Keytruda plus chemotherapy

    The Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) has called for change in the way immunotherapy drugs are researched and evaluated after the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) handed MSD’s Keytruda plus chemotherapy a rejection. Although NICE reversed a draft rejection of Keytruda (pembrolizumab) and has now recommended it for use on the NHS […] More

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    A Snapshot of COVID’s Global Havoc

    Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Some medical societies feature sessions at their annual meetings that feel like they’re 24 hours long, yet few have the courage to schedule a session that actually runs all day and all night. But the five societies sponsoring the IDWeek conference […] More

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    Explaindio Business Edition

    Product Name: Explaindio Business Edition Click here to get Explaindio Business Edition at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. Explaindio Business Edition is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the […] More

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    Arguing to Undo the ACA. Harming Medicare. Do They Go Hand in Hand?

    Stephanie Stapleton It’s a tried-and-true campaign strategy. Candidates go on the attack, claiming their opponent will do harm to Medicare. After all, people 65 and older are good about making it to the polls on Election Day. These voters are also generally motivated to protect the federal health insurance program for seniors. It’s no surprise, […] More

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    Membrane-attached protein protects bacteria and chloroplasts from stress — ScienceDaily

    Stress is present everywhere, even bacteria and plant cells have to cope with it. They express various specific stress proteins, but how exactly this line of defense works is often not clear. A group of scientists headed by Professor Dirk Schneider of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has now discovered a protective mechanism in cyanobacteria […] More

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    The arthritis drug tocilizumab doesn’t appear to help fight COVID-19

    An initial crop of clinical trials testing an anti-inflammatory drug against COVID-19 do not look promising. The best available evidence among these trials “doesn’t show that this drug is beneficial,” says Adarsh Bhimraj, an infectious diseases physician at the Cleveland Clinic, who was not involved in the research. The drug, tocilizumab, is a treatment for […] More

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    Deaths rattle South Korea’s seasonal flu vaccination, but authority presses ahead with free scheme

    South Korea is preparing to fight two infectious diseases this winter: the novel coronavirus and the flu. But reports of deaths after flu shot vaccination may jeopardize the second effort. As of Friday afternoon local time, 36 people have died in Korea after getting flu shots, including a 17-year-old high schooler, Korea Biomedical Review reported. […] More

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    N.J. Gov. signs laws aimed at reforming long-term care industry

    Gov. Phil Murphy signed two bills into law Friday aimed at addressing staffing shortages and residents’ isolation at New Jersey’s long-term care facilities, two areas of vulnerability exposed during the coronavirus pandemic. The bills signed Friday were an outgrowth of a consultant’s report released in June. More than 7,000 people have died from COVID-19 in […] More

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    Extreme events in quantum cascade lasers enable an optical neuron system 10,000× faster than biological neurons — ScienceDaily

    Extreme events occur in many observable contexts. Nature is a prolific source: rogue water waves surging high above the swell, monsoon rains, wildfire, etc. From climate science to optics, physicists have classified the characteristics of extreme events, extending the notion to their respective domains of expertise. For instance, extreme events can take place in telecommunication […] More

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    Q&A: How a wearable can help treat sleep apnoea – Med-Tech Innovation

    Med-Tech Innovation News caught up with Gilad Glick, CEO, Itamar Medical, to discuss its sleep apnoea innovation, as well as discussing the market itself. Where did the idea for WatchPAT come from? The story of Itamar Medical and the WatchPAT device begins with the company co-founder Prof. Peretz Levie, a psychologist specialising in sleep medicine […] More

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    Coronavirus News Roundup, October 17-October 23

    The items below are highlights from the free newsletter, “Smart, useful, science stuff about COVID-19.” To receive newsletter issues daily in your inbox, sign up here. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) this week broadened its definition of a “close contact” with an infected person, thereby expanding “the pool of people considered at risk […] More

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    NICE recommends Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for treatment of HNSCC

    NICE has recommended pembrolizumab for the treatment of metastatic or unresectable recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The UK National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published final draft guidance recommending Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for the treatment of untreated metastatic or unresectable recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The drug is produced by Merck Sharp & Dohme. The […] More

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    Rural America Facing a Medical Access Issue

    When a hospital closes for business, the ripple effect extends near and far. Existing patients, the closing hospital’s nearby residents, the medical facilities that will tend to these residents — all are forced to make unique decisions, based on that one closing.    Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have studied this ripple […] More

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    Unauthorized Affiliate – error page

    Product Name: Unauthorized Affiliate – error page Click here to get Unauthorized Affiliate – error page at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. Unauthorized Affiliate – error page is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked […] More

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    CDC calls for stronger coronavirus-mitigation measures at the polls

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday called for stronger coronavirus mitigation measures at the polls.  The agency’s report comes as voters cast ballots with less than two weeks left until Election Day. The CDC said “critical considerations” for safer in-person voting include more attention to correct mask use and lowering congregation at the […] More

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    COVID-19 a double blow for chronic disease patients — ScienceDaily

    There has never been a more dangerous time than the COVID-19 pandemic for people with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cancer, respiratory problems or cardiovascular conditions, new UNSW Sydney research has found. Among the adverse impacts of the pandemic for people with NCDs, the study found they are more vulnerable to catching and dying […] More

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    Demand rises for single-use surgical technologies in the era of Covid-19

    As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to unfold, it is clear that the virus has fundamentally impacted every aspect of life in the United States. The healthcare sector has had to completely reimagine much of what was once standard operating procedure. This has driven adoption of new tools in many areas of the life sciences industry. […] More

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    CRISPR turns normal body fat into a type that burns energy

    By Michael Le Page Gene editing can transform normal fat cells into a type of fat that burns energyShutterstock / Design_Cells Metabolic conditions linked to obesity could be treated by removing fat from a person, turning it into energy-burning “beige fat” using CRISPR gene editing and then implanting the altered fat back into the body, […] More

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