Global Scientific

Coronavirus: Exploiting nature ‘drives outbreaks of new diseases’

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Seized ivory in Malaysia waiting to be destroyed New evidence has emerged of a link between human exploitation of nature and pandemics.Close contact with wild animals through hunting, trade or habitat loss puts the world at increased risk of outbreaks of new diseases, say scientists.Coronavirus is thought to have originated in bats, with other wild animals, possibly pangolins, playing a role in transmission to
Global Scientific

The Pandemic Shows Why the U.S. Must Invest in Public Research

In the weeks to come, we’re about to relearn that old truth: necessity is the mother of invention. Researchers will work around-the-clock because of the world’s need for a cure for COVID-19. But it’s worth keeping a corollary thought in all of our minds: necessity may be the mother of invention, but curiosity and imagination are the parents of discovery. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it abundantly clear that the
Global Scientific

Flower power: How plants bounce back after crushing blows

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption A busy lizzie, an example of a flower able to recover quickly from being trampled on Some flowers can recover with remarkable speed after a major accident, such as being walked upon by humans.Scientists found that species including orchid and sweet pea could re-orient themselves in 10-48 hours after an injuryThese plants are able to bend, twist and reposition their stems to ensure that
Global Scientific

Astronomers Battle Space Explorers for Access to Moon’s Far Side

As countries and private companies race to return to the moon, the need to protect the lunar far side—the hemisphere of Earth’s companion that always faces away from our planet—continues to grow. For decades, scientists have argued that the far side’s unique combination of accessibility and isolation makes it vital real estate for a plethora of space science activities. Nevertheless, the quickening pace of public and private lunar exploration could
Global Scientific

Yes, Liquor Stores Are Essential Businesses

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, access to alcohol will likely become limited due to social-distancing measures mandated by government officials. Some of these necessary public health strategies—shelter-in-place and closing of non-essential businesses—may in turn cause people with alcohol use disorder (AUD) to find themselves in unsafe scenarios. Forward thinking about how to reduce harms to people with AUD is critical. Untreated AUD is often managed with daily alcohol
Global Scientific

Coronavirus: ‘Keep cats indoors’, vets recommend

Image copyright Victoria Gill Veterinary scientists have recommended cat owners keep their pets indoors to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. But the British Veterinary Association said "owners should not worry" about any risk of infection from their pets. "There isn't a single case of a pet dog or cat infecting a human with Covid-19," Dr Angel Almendros, from City University in Hong Kong, told BBC News.Research has shown
Global Scientific

Coronavirus Misinformation Its Own Deadly Condition

“You know, the other day we had a bright sunny day as we do today in New York, after many days of gloomy darkness and cold. And I went outside to get some milk. And saw the streets were full of people. And they were all young people who’d somehow gotten the message that this is only dangerous for old people.” Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author the
Global Scientific

Pink Moon: Europe illuminated by lunar light show

Stargazers have enjoyed the emergence of what is known as a pink moon in the night skies of Europe.Despite its name, there is not any noticeable colour difference to the full moon - due to reach a peak in the UK at 03:55 BST on Wednesday.The pink supermoon name is a northern Native American reference to an early-blooming wildflower and is first seen across North America as spring begins.Tuesday evening's
Global Scientific

How to Stop Science Thieves

Earlier this year, the chair of Harvard’s chemistry department was arrested and charged with lying to federal law-enforcement officials about secretly working for the Chinese government. While the story of nanotechnology pioneer Charles Lieber is shocking and dramatic, it is indicative of a broader challenge facing America’s leading scientific research institutions. We must secure the research we conduct on our campuses from foreign interference while at the same time protecting