Medical Science

Watching TV helps birds make better food choices — ScienceDaily

By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. Seeing the 'disgust response' in others helps them recognise distasteful prey by their conspicuous markings without having to taste them, and this can potentially increase both the birds' and their prey's survival rate. The study, published in the Journal of Animal
Medical Science

Pacific marine national monuments do not harm fishing industry — ScienceDaily

New scientific findings released today in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications, show that expansion Aof the Pacific Remote Islands and Papahanaumokuakea marine national monuments did not cause overall economic harm to the Hawaii-based longline tuna fishing fleet. The results of this study, which was supported by the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project, represent the first economic analysis of two of the largest protected areas on Earth. The monuments protect an
Medical Science

More clues for how the monkeyflower got its spots — ScienceDaily

The monkeyflower, or Mimulus, though possessing a relatively simple genome is able to produce a stunning array of pigmentation patterns. A team of researchers is one step closer to understanding exactly how this genus of wildflowers is able to achieve such remarkable diversity, their work will be published Thursday in Current Biology. Visual variations such as spots or stripes can act as camouflage and potentially as a means of communication
Medical Science

Black phosphorus tunnel field-effect transistor as an alternative ultra-low power switch? — ScienceDaily

Researchers have reported a black phosphorus transistor that can be used as an alternative ultra-low power switch. A research team led by Professor Sungjae Cho in the KAIST Department of Physics developed a thickness-controlled black phosphorus tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) that shows 10-times lower switching power consumption as well as 10,000-times lower standby power consumption than conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. The research team said they developed fast and low-power
Medical Science

Olive oil in the diet may also help mitigate aging-related diseases — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School discover a potential new way in which diet influences aging-related diseases. Doug Mashek, PhD, a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, leads a team of researchers who discovered that olive oil in the Mediterranean diet may hold the key to improving lifespan and mitigating aging-related diseases. Over the last eight years, with the help of multiple
Medical Science

Scientists unravel mystery of photosynthesis — ScienceDaily

Plants have been harnessing the sun's energy for hundreds of millions of years. Algae and photosynthetic bacteria have been doing the same for even longer, all with remarkable efficiency and resiliency. It's no wonder, then, that scientists have long sought to understand exactly how they do this, hoping to use this knowledge to improve human-made devices such as solar panels and sensors. Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)
Medical Science

Two recent papers detail the of use label-free microscopic techniques to visualize extracellular vesicles, which are associated with cancer — ScienceDaily

The Biophotonics Imaging Lab at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology has developed imaging techniques that investigate tissues without using any staining or labels. The researchers created a unique system using a laser source that can capture more information about a tissue compared to traditional imaging techniques. That system provides better visualization of extracellular vesicles -- small packages which are known to increase in number and be associated
Medical Science

New method to isolate atomic sheets and create new materials — ScienceDaily

Two-dimensional materials from layered van der Waals (vdW) crystals hold great promise for electronic, optoelectronic, and quantum devices, but making/manufacturing them has been limited by the lack of high-throughput techniques for exfoliating single-crystal monolayers with sufficient size and high quality. Columbia University researchers report today in Science that they have invented a new method -- using ultraflat gold films -- to disassemble vdW single crystals layer by layer into monolayers
Medical Science

DNA from ancient packrat nests helps unpack Earth’s past — ScienceDaily

New work shows how using next-generation DNA sequencing on ancient packrat middens -- nests made out of plant material, fragments of insects, bones, fecal matter, and urine -- could provide ecological snapshots of Earth's past. Published today in the journal Ecology and Evolution, the study may pave the way for scientists to better understand how plant communities -- and possibly animals, bacteria, and fungi as well -- will respond to
Medical Science

Engineer’s MagNI can be wirelessly charged and programmed with magnetic fields — ScienceDaily

A team of Rice University engineers has introduced the first neural implant that can be both programmed and charged remotely with a magnetic field. Their breakthrough may make possible imbedded devices like a spinal cord-stimulating unit with a battery-powered magnetic transmitter on a wearable belt. The integrated microsystem, called MagNI (for magnetoelectric neural implant), incorporates magnetoelectric transducers. These allow the chip to harvest power from an alternating magnetic field outside