Medical Science

Fast food intake leads to weight gain in preschoolers — ScienceDaily

There is a strong link between the amount of fast food that pre-school age children consume and their likelihood of becoming overweight or obese, according to a new Dartmouth-led study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 25 percent of children between the ages of 2 and 5 years are overweight or obese in the U.S. These conditions increase the risk
Medical Science

High-tech imaging under UV light shows which parts go where when millipedes mate — ScienceDaily

Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery -- until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow. The findings are published in a new paper in the journal Arthropod Structure
Medical Science

Our memory prefers essence over form — ScienceDaily

What clues does our memory use to connect a current situation to a situation from the past? The results of a study conducted by researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, -- working in collaboration with CY Cergy Paris University in France -- contrast sharply with the explanations found until now in the existing literature. The researchers have demonstrated that similarities in structure and essence (the heart of a
Medical Science

Computer simulations visualize how DNA converts cells into stem cells — ScienceDaily

Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW -- The Netherlands) and the Max Planck Institute in Münster (Germany) have revealed how an essential protein helps to activate genomic DNA during the conversion of regular adult human cells into stem cells. Their findings are published in the Biophysical Journal. A cell's identity is driven by which DNA is "read" or "not read" at any point in time. Signalling in the cell to
Medical Science

A smart jumpsuit provides information on infants’ movement and development — ScienceDaily

A new innovation makes it possible, for the first time, to quantitatively assess children's spontaneous movement in the natural environment. Researchers have developed a smart jumpsuit, or a garment that accurately measures the spontaneous and voluntary movement of infants from the age of five months. Details on their motility help in assessing abnormal neurological development, among other things. The study on the smart jumpsuit and the related analysis method applied
Medical Science

The invention may help to make robots one day that can think like humans — ScienceDaily

University of Central Florida researchers are helping to close the gap separating human and machine minds. In a study featured as the cover article appearing today in the journal Science Advances, a UCF research team showed that by combining two promising nanomaterials into a new superstructure, they could create a nanoscale device that mimics the neural pathways of brain cells used for human vision. "This is a baby step toward
Medical Science

Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way — ScienceDaily

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. The newly-found corbomycin and the lesser-known complestatin have a never-before-seen way to kill bacteria, which is achieved by blocking the function of the bacterial cell wall. The discovery comes from a family of antibiotics called glycopeptides that are produced by soil bacteria. The
Medical Science

Brain imprints on cranial bones from great apes and humans refute the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique — ScienceDaily

The left and right side of our brain are specialized for some cognitive abilities. For example, in humans, language is processed predominantly in the left hemisphere, and the right hand is controlled by the motor cortex in the left hemisphere. The functional lateralization is reflected by morphological asymmetry of the brain. Left and right hemisphere differ subtly in brain anatomy, the distribution of nerve cells, their connectivity and neurochemistry. Asymmetries
Medical Science

Molecule offers hope for halting Parkinson’s — ScienceDaily

A promising molecule has offered hope for a new treatment that could stop or slow Parkinson's, something no treatment can currently do. Researchers from the University of Helsinki found that molecule BT13 has the potential to both boost levels of dopamine, the chemical that is lost in Parkinson's, as well as protect the dopamine-producing brain cells from dying. The results from the study, co-funded by Parkinson's UK and published online