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Yale’s Ventilator Splitter Receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization

Vent Multiplexor LLC announced that it received FDA Emergency Use Authorization for its device that can split a single ventilator so that it can be used by two patients simultaneously.

The Vent Multiplexor device was developed by a team of students and faculty at Yale University and Yale New Haven Hospital. It is a patent-pending co-ventilation device intended for temporary use when two patients both require emergency mechanical ventilation when only one ventilator is available. Importantly, the device allows ventilator sharing between two patients whose lung capacities and ventilator setting requirements are different. The Vent Multiplexor can be produced with 3D printing and minimal production lead time, according to the company.

The
FDA Emergency Use Authorization was granted about a week after two critically-ill
COVID-19 patients at Yale New Haven Hospital, with different lung sizes and tidal
volume requirements, were successfully co-ventilated using the device.

The
company plans to now increase production of the device and partner with healthcare
entities across the United States and internationally to help alleviate
ventilator shortages. 

“Ultimately,
we are all part of a global community,” said Vent Multiplexor President Todd
Higgins. “The call to action is for all of us to do everything in our power to
help wherever that help is needed. We intend to answer the call.”

Flashback: Researchers Turn One Ventilator into Two…

Via: Vent Multiplexor and Yale School of Medicine




Cici Zhou is currently a medical student at the University of Oklahoma. In the past, she has done management consulting for medical startups and recently spent summer as a lab researcher at UC San Francisco. As a future physician, she’s excited by the intersection of medicine + technology because of its ability to completely transform the industry and touch millions of lives.




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